$166,000 :: 32417 COLUMBUS, Other MI, 48088-6212

3 beds, 2 baths
Home size: 1,322 sq ft
Lot Size: 0 sq ft
Added: 08/21/03, Last Updated: 07/30/18
Property Type: Single Family
MLS Number: 21482554
Community: UPDATE
Tract: NONE
Status: Sold

100% MAIN FREE COLONIAL IN DESIREABLE N WARREN*MANY UPDATES&ALL UNDER WARRANTY:ROOF,SIDNG,GUTTERS,WINDOWS,DOORWALL,GARDEN WINDOW,FURN,C/A,ALL DOORS&STORMS,DISHWASHER,POOL*MUSKIN ABOVE GROUND POOL W/DECK(99)*NEW SHED(99)*GREAT 2ND DECK OFF KIT*HRDWD FLRS IN LR*TONGUE&GROOVE PINE DR-GORGEOUS*WHITE KIT*AWSOME PROF FIN&DRY WALLED BSMT*REMOD 1/2 BTH(99)*UPPER BTH VANITY(2003)*

Listed with RE/MAX Masters, Inc.


Brought to you by Janet Hull and Thomas Bush, Real Estate One, Inc.. Call me today at 1-855-Janet-Tom, or visit my website at www.JanetandThomas.com!


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$114,900 :: 32045 STRICKER, Warren MI, 48088

3 beds, 1 bath
Home size: 1,000 sq ft
Lot Size: 0 sq ft
Added: 07/29/18, Last Updated: 07/29/18
Property Type: Single Family
MLS Number: 410806
Community: Warren (50023)
Tract: BALMORAL PARK
Status: Sold

Listed with RE/MAX Suburban, Inc.


Brought to you by Janet Hull and Thomas Bush, Real Estate One, Inc.. Call me today at 1-855-Janet-Tom, or visit my website at www.JanetandThomas.com!


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$129,900 :: 24290 STEWART AVE, Warren MI, 48089-5729

3 beds, 2 baths
Home size: 884 sq ft
Lot Size: 9,147 sq ft
Added: 07/27/18, Last Updated: 07/27/18
Property Type: Single Family
MLS Number: 21481455
Community: Warren (50023)
Tract: NICOLAI ESTATES – WARREN
Status: Active

Listed with St Jude Realty


Brought to you by Janet Hull and Thomas Bush, Real Estate One, Inc.. Call me today at 1-855-Janet-Tom, or visit my website at www.JanetandThomas.com!


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$145,400 :: 28256 Bradner, Warren MI, 48088

Property Photo

3 beds, 1 bath
Home size: 1,095 sq ft
Lot Size: 7,840 sq ft
Added: 06/13/18, Last Updated: 07/27/18
Property Type: Single Family
MLS Number: 31350598
Community: Warren (50023)
Tract: Tiger Lane Subdivision
Status: Sold

Perfectly adorable home with large, well-maintained backyard and up-to-date mechanicals. Furnace/AC/HWT 2015, roof 2004, and newer windows. Cute kitchen updated in late 90s with medium maple cabinets, small pantry and all appliances. Mostly updated bath- very clean. Carpets were just professionally cleaned – hardwood underneath! Warren Woods Schools in sought-after subdivision.

Listed with Keller Williams Realty Lakeside


Brought to you by Janet Hull and Thomas Bush, Real Estate One, Inc.. Call me today at 1-855-Janet-Tom, or visit my website at www.JanetandThomas.com!


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Some Not-So-Tiny Obstacles in the Growing Market for Tiny Houses

(TNS)—When Tom Alsani heard about plans for a tiny-home community in St. Petersburg, Fla., he got so excited he immediately wanted to know more.

“Right now I have a house with three bedrooms, but the kids are gone and I’m trying to downsize,” says Alsani, a quality-control inspector for furniture companies. “To me, a tiny house is very, very attractive. It’s a state of mind; it’s not about how big you have it but the level of contentment and happiness.”

Few housing options have captured the public imagination like tiny houses, seen as an affordable and, yes, adorable antidote to the excesses of modern life. Their appeal is wide—to empty nesters like Alsani, soon to be retired and living on Social Security, to millennials, too burdened with student loan debt to buy a normal-size house, and to vagabonds at heart who like the idea of packing up and hitting the road at a moment’s notice.

But for all the enthusiasm, the tiny house movement isn’t moving very fast. Financing, zoning laws and entrenched attitudes have conspired to limit tiny houses to a tiny percentage of the nation’s housing stock.

“With tiny homes, because it has a new name and is not called an RV or a mobile home, people don’t know how to treat it,” says Preston Melson, a partner in a St. Petersburg company that makes tiny houses.

Today, though, “tiny house” typically means a dwelling of 400 square feet or less on wheels. While the mobility is attractive, it has impeded the widespread acceptance of tiny homes.

Legally, wheeled houses are considered recreational vehicles and are generally restricted to RV parks by county and municipal zoning laws. Many so-called “tiny homers” don’t want to live in RV parks, however, because they cater primarily to vacationers, not permanent residents.

Owners who don’t plan to move their tiny homes can build them as permanent structures on vacant land where zoning permits; thus, the challenge of tiny houses “is where to put them,” Melson says. “That’s the No. 1 enemy.”

Paying for tiny houses is getting easier. Since 2013, SunTrust’s LightStream division has offered tiny-home loans—actually, personal, non-secured loans of up to $100,000—for as long as seven years. Interest rates range from 4.04 percent to 11.04 percent, depending on the borrower’s credit history. (The minimum score is 660, and the applicant must have some assets like a 401(k) or stock.)

Though it has fewer borrowers than for car and home improvement loans, the market for tiny-home loans “punches above its weight,” says Julie Olian, LightStream’s vice president of Public Relations. “Our portfolio has grown as the market has increased. It’s a great way to get a first home and it’s one that’s flexible in terms of where it is [located].”

©2018 Tampa Bay Times (St. Petersburg, Fla.)
Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC

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Minutes, or Money? Homeowners Save by Trading Off Travel to Work

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In city cores, commuting from farther out takes time, but can save thousands, according to an analysis newly released by Zillow.

In Boston, there is a 13.4 percent difference in home prices, typically, between the center of the city and locales 15 minutes out—the highest rate of savings, and totaling $57,260. In Seattle, the difference is 11.3 percent, or $54,599; in Washington, D.C., the difference is 9.4 percent, or $37,709. The analysis factored in 34 of the largest metros, in conjunction with HERE Technologies, a city intelligence and mapping platform.

In approximately one-third of the cities examined, however, the opposite is true. Compared to downtown, homes are pricier in suburbs in Texas—Dallas-Fort Worth, Houston and San Antonio, specifically—and in Baltimore, Detroit and Sacramento. San Antonio has the highest premium rate, at 14.2 percent (translating to $27,509), and Dallas has the lowest, at 0.1 percent ($308).

Convenience costs—but according to Aaron Terrazas, senior economist at Zillow, 15 minutes daily equals five months over a lifetime. With affordability eroding, is shorter travel worth it?

“There has been an urban revival in many U.S. cities over the past two decades driven by evolving preferences among young adults and a long-term shift in the American economy toward service jobs, but, this does come with a cost,” says Terrazas. “In many cities, there’s a growing tradeoff between a short commute and an affordable home. The regular commute to and from work looms large over the typical American worker’s life. Over a 30-year career, reducing your one-way commute by just 15 minutes frees up five months of one’s life for more rewarding pursuits.

“For some home shoppers, it may be worth paying more to spend less time sitting in traffic, but for others, deteriorating mortgage affordability and lifestyle needs and wants make longer commutes a reality,” Terrazas says.

Across age groups, closer commutes are important. According to a January National Association of REALTORS® (NAR) survey, both millennials and the Silent Generation would live in an apartment or townhome if it meant less travel to work.

For more information, please visit www.zillow.com.

Suzanne De Vita is RISMedia’s online news editor. Email her your real estate news ideas at sdevita@rismedia.com. For the latest real estate news and trends, bookmark RISMedia.com.

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Forget a Garage—Buyers Won’t Budge on High-Rated Schools

Realtor_com_Schools

Buyers have their eyes on schools, and with the irrefutable link between the quality of schools and values, a district with high ratings trumps all—even coveted features of a home, according to a new realtor.com® survey.

To get into their desired district, 78 percent of the homebuyers surveyed had to let go of something on their wish list. When asked what they would compromise on, approximately one-fifth (19 percent) of respondents would forgo a garage, while 17 percent would go without a kitchen that has been remodeled. Another 17 percent would settle for less bedrooms.

Being within an in-demand district is “important” to 73 percent of respondents to the survey, and even more so to those with children, and those who are younger. What are the characteristics of a “good” school? Accelerated programs, arts and music and diversity are all factors, but the most important is test scores, according to the survey.

“Most buyers understand that they may not be able to find a home that covers every single item on their wish list, but our survey shows that school districts are an area where many buyers aren’t willing to compromise,” says Danielle Hale, chief economist at realtor.com. “For many buyers, ‘location, location, location,’ means ‘schools, schools, schools.’”

Generally, homes in proximity to sought-after schools move quicker than others, and are pricier.

For more information, please visit www.realtor.com.

DeVita_Suzanne_60x60Suzanne De Vita is RISMedia’s online news editor. Email her your real estate news ideas at sdevita@rismedia.com. For the latest real estate news and trends, bookmark RISMedia.com.

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$195,000 :: 32427 DESMOND DR, Warren MI, 48093-1154

Property Photo

4 beds, 3 baths
Home size: 2,017 sq ft
Lot Size: 12,632 sq ft
Added: 05/10/18, Last Updated: 07/23/18
Property Type: Single Family
MLS Number: 21446309
Community: Warren (50023)
Tract: EASTBROOKE MANOR
The price of this listing was last reduced on 6/1/2018 by 9%
Status: Sold

4 bedroom 2 1/2 bath Colonial in North Warren. Hardwood floors throughout. Spacious Formal dining room. Open concept Kitchen, Breakfast Nook and Family Room with natural brick fireplace, wood beams and doorwall. Master bedroom with full ceramic bath. Recently updated Furnace and A/C. Freshly painted throughout. Backyard includes shed. Pool table in the finished basement stays! Corner lot, side entry 2 car garage, fenced yard and storage shed finished off this great home! Very Motivated Seller, Bring ALL offers!

Listed with Moving The Mitten RE Group Inc


Brought to you by Janet Hull and Thomas Bush, Real Estate One, Inc.. Call me today at 1-855-Janet-Tom, or visit my website at www.JanetandThomas.com!


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Don’t Know Your Mortgage Rate? You Could Be Costing Yourself Thousands

(TNS)—Not knowing your mortgage rate can be an expensive mistake, especially in this rising interest rate market. Yet nearly three in 10 mortgage holders (29 percent) either didn’t know their mortgage rate or wouldn’t say, according to a survey by Bankrate.

This is a big problem, says Martin Choy, operations manager at Westwood Mortgage in Seattle.

“Most homeowners should know what their rate is. If they have an adjustable rate mortgage [ARM], then they should contact their lender immediately and get their current rate,” Choy says.

Rates Are Climbing, so Borrowers Should Act Now
As rates continue to rise, this could be your last chance for many years to lock in a lower rate.

“During the big boom, before this last election, we could refinance mortgages at no cost because the rates were so low, but now the rates are heading up,” Choy says.

The average rates on 30-, 15- and 10-year fixed refinances have risen from a year ago, according to Bankrate’s weekly survey of large lenders. The benchmark 30-year fixed-rate mortgage rose to 4.70 percent (as of July 11, 2018) from 4.13 percent a year earlier.

A $200,000 mortgage with a 4.70 percent interest rate costs $119 a month more in interest than the same mortgage with a 4.13 percent rate. As rates and mortgage amounts go up, the impact on your bottom line increases. Over time, this difference in rates can cost you thousands of dollars.

Good Candidates for Refinancing
When you refinance your mortgage, you pay off the remaining balance on your current loan and get a new one. You can get a new rate, new terms, or a new rate and new terms. You can get a cash-out refinance where you tap into the equity to extract cash and then get a new mortgage. You can even pay money in and take out a smaller mortgage.

Those with adjustable-rate mortgages may be good candidates for refinancing. As mortgage rates climb, so will your monthly payments. If you lock in a fixed-rate mortgage now, you may be able to save thousands of dollars later.

The same is true for people with high-rate mortgages who have since improved their credit.

“There are many variables in determining whether refinancing is a good option,” says Choy. “How much do you owe? How much is your house appraised for? Is your credit score good? If you’re in better financial shape now, both with your monthly debt ratio and credit score than when you got your mortgage, then you could qualify for better rates.”

Today, most people aren’t getting ARMs because the rates are about the same as fixed-rate mortgages, says Choy.

“It’s always better to get a fixed-rate loan than an ARM when interest rates are equal. Now is a good time to refinance an ARM before rates get even higher.”

Cash-Out Refinance Options
If you have outstanding higher-rate consumer debt and an above-market mortgage interest rate, a cash-out refinance might be a good option. That way you can consolidate all the debt into one presumably more affordable monthly payment.

Not only are mortgage rates rising; so are interest rates for credit card debt. Because credit card interest rates follow in lockstep with mortgage rates, people with credit card debt might be looking at higher monthly payments.

“With a cash-out refi, you can use that money to pay off debt and get a new mortgage with better rates. That is an option for some homeowners,” says Choy.

What Does Refinancing Cost?
Refinancing fees vary by lender and state, so be sure to shop around for specific costs. Bankrate’s mortgage rate tables are a good place to start looking at rates in your area. Calculate when you’ll break even on the new mortgage by taking into account the costs of refinancing and any prepayment penalty for paying off your mortgage early.

On average, borrowers can expect to pay between 3 and 6 percent of their balance in refinancing fees. Costs might include:

  • Application fee: This charge varies by lender and is used to cover processing your application and credit report. The cost ranges from $75-$300.
  • Loan origination fee: The lender charges this fee for preparing your loan. This may be between 0 percent and 1.5 percent of the loan principal.
  • Points: You might pay loan-discount points, which is a one-time fee for reducing the interest rate on your loan. Each point is equal to 1 percent of the amount of your mortgage. There is another point-based fee charged by lenders to earn money on the loan. This latter fee of up to 3 percent of the loan principal can sometimes be negotiated.

Other fees might include:

  • Appraisal fee
  • Title search/title insurance
  • FHA, RDS or VA fees or PMI
  • Homeowner’s insurance
  • Attorney review
  • Inspection
  • Surveys

Sometimes these fees can be rolled into your new mortgage, or the lender will pay them in exchange for a higher interest rate. Refinances that don’t require borrowers to pay these up-front fees are known as “no-cost” refinancing.

©2018 Bankrate.com
Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC

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$95,000 :: 8316 Timkin, Warren MI, 48089

Property Photo

3 beds, 2 baths
Home size: 1,150 sq ft
Lot Size: 7,405 sq ft
Added: 07/20/18, Last Updated: 07/20/18
Property Type: Single Family
MLS Number: 31354445
Community: Warren (50023)
Tract: PIPERS VAN DYKE SUB NO 1 LOT 1
Status: Active

To followHome remodeler updated this one for himself. New electrical, including fixtures was installed in 2015. New plumbing, including fixtures was installed in 2015. The kitchen was remodeled with oak cabinets, granite counters, ceramic tile and stainless-steel appliances. Both full bathrooms were updated. Oak trim throughout. Beautiful hardwood floors and ceramic tile throughout as well. The 3rd bedroom is currently set up as a first-floor laundry. This can be changed with the laundry relocated to the basement. You will love the covered cedar deck, which is perfect for your summer barbecue plans. This is the home – which is set upon a large lot – that you have been waiting for. Schedule your showing right away. You will be glad you did.

Listed with Keller Williams Realty Lakeside


Brought to you by Janet Hull and Thomas Bush, Real Estate One, Inc.. Call me today at 1-855-Janet-Tom, or visit my website at www.JanetandThomas.com!


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