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Amazon’s Alexa Adds More Real Estate Skills

Warren, MI Properties

More brokerages are finding ways to integrate the rise of digital voice assistants, like Amazon’s Alexa, into providing real estate…

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Rising Rents Lead to Increased Homeless Population

Warren, MI Properties

If New York metro rents grow five percent, 3,000 more people will be forced into homelessness Continue Reading →

Real Estate Q&A: What Happens When the Home You’re Buying Can’t Get Insurance Coverage?

Warren, MI Properties

(TNS)—Q: We are buying a home and had a “four-point” inspection done for the homeowner’s insurance. The insurer declined to cover the house due to the brand of the electrical panel fuse box. What gives? -Dan

A: Most insurance companies require a “four-point” home inspection before insuring a property. The inspection focuses on the four main causes of most insurance claims: HVAC (heating, ventilation and air conditioning); electrical wiring and panels; the roof; and plumbing. This inspection doesn’t concern itself with cosmetic or other issues outside of the four listed systems.

Certain brands of electrical panels, particularly those installed before 2000, have been found to cause problems and not perform as they should. A fuse is supposed to trip when there is a problem in order to prevent a much larger problem. Many home fires are caused when fuses or panels malfunction.

If the insurer is denying coverage due to a suspect panel, the worst solution, in my opinion, would be to try a different insurer. Just because another company will give you the coverage doesn’t make the panel any safer.

If you are faced with this situation, speak to the seller about replacing the panel before the deal goes any further. If the seller won’t budge, your best bet is to find a different, and safer, home.

Gary M. Singer is a Florida attorney and board-certified as an expert in real estate law by the Florida Bar.

©2017 Sun Sentinel (Fort Lauderdale, Fla.)

Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC

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Which Grocery Store Lifts Home Values Most?

Warren, MI Properties

Homeowners living near these three grocers are earning the most profit at resale, according to a new study.

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Survey: Pets Drive Millennials’ Decision to Buy

Warren, MI Properties

Recent home buyers ages 18 to 36 rank more space for their dogs higher than marriage or having children as a motivation for purchasing.

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New Avenue for Military Vets to Enter Commercial Real Estate

Warren, MI Properties

Former U.S. servicemembers can now take advantage of the CCIM Veterans in Real Estate Program, with tuition and fees covered under GI Bill…

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Mortgage Rates Aren’t Budging

Warren, MI Properties

The 30-year fixed-rate mortgage continues to average below 4 percent.

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Historic N.J. Home Listed for $10

Warren, MI Properties

Here’s why a 3,912-square-foot home in Montclair, N.J., built by a famous architect sold for $1.4 million two years ago—but is now going…

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Big Slowdown in Growth of Rental Rates

Warren, MI Properties

Monthly costs are falling the most in some of the country’s largest cities. Find out where.

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How to Avoid Flying in the Dreaded Middle Seat

Warren, MI Properties

(TNS)—Flying in the middle seat is rarely a pleasant experience, but it’s considerably worse when you never saw it coming. While many airlines allow you to select a non-middle seat ahead of time, even that strategy isn’t fool-proof.

After all, somebody has to sit in the middle, right? When a flight is overbooked, people are moved for any number of reasons. If something goes awry, that someone stuck in the middle could very well be you.

If you hate the middle, however, you can minimize your chances by planning ahead. Here’s how:

Select Your Seats Early

Most major airlines allow you to select your seats on many paid fares and award fares. If you don’t select your seat when you purchase your ticket, you can generally log into your account (or search for your flight using your confirmation number) and select your seats later.

If you want to avoid a middle, your best bet is exercising your choice as early as you can.

Don’t Book Basic Economy

Some fare types don’t allow you to select a seat—specifically, the basic economy fare. These fares are marketed as “bare bones,” and they are.

Take the American Airlines basic economy fare, for example. With this low-cost fare, your seat is assigned at check-in, or you can pay extra to select a seat.

If you want to avoid the middle, avoid basic economy fares or be willing to pay a little extra for a seat assignment.

Book Early Boarding

If you have an assigned seat, you’re probably safe. But, what if your airline doesn’t assign seats at all?

Yep, I’m talking about Southwest Airlines, a carrier that boards by groups instead.

If you want to make sure you sit where you want, you can pay $15 per leg for early boarding. This will get you in the “A” group, which means you’ll have your pick of seats before others board the plane.

Check In Early

Southwest Airlines gives preference to people who check in early, as well. If you check in 24 hours early, for example, you’ll get in the earliest boarding group. Those who check in last are typically part of the “C” group, which gets the remaining middle seats that are left.

If you want to give yourself the best shot at a seat you like with Southwest, checking in exactly 24 hours before your flight is the way to go.

Still, checking in early with other airlines is smart, even if you have a confirmed seat already. By checking in and printing your boarding pass as soon as you can (typically the 24-hour mark), you can solidify your claim on your chosen seat and ward off any shenanigans (like a flight attendant moving you to accommodate someone else).

Pay for an Upgrade

Last, but not least, paying for an upgrade is one of the best ways to sit where you want on a plane. You don’t have to upgrade to a different fare class, either. Many times, you can pay extra for “premium seats” with extra leg room or a preferred spot on the plane.

When you pay for a seat, you can almost guarantee it’s yours. So, try not to balk at the idea of paying an extra $15 or $40 for a seat of your choosing. If you wind up in the middle against your will, $15 or even $40 might seem like an amazing deal.

©2017 Travelpulse

Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC

For the latest real estate news and trends, bookmark RISMedia.com.

The post How to Avoid Flying in the Dreaded Middle Seat appeared first on RISMedia.

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